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African Lionfish from the Red Sea

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This area is all about things that can affect the Boatless-Land Fisherman as to State and Local Regulations, Rules that pertain to areas that we may fish and enviromental issues that we need to get involved in. Please read these posts and get invovled. We are stonger in Numbers.

African Lionfish from the Red Sea

Postby StyngRay » Sat May 02, 2009 2:08 am

The Lionfish Invasion!
What is an Invasive Species?

The predaceous Northern snakehead (Channa argus), native to China, is a recent alien invader of North America. Reproducing populations of snakeheads have now been discovered in Maryland, California, and Florida.

An "invasive species" is a species

• that is non-native (or alien) to the ecosystem it occupies and

• whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm, or harm to human health.

Some scientists classify an alien species as an invasive species if it begins to reproduce and establish a population in its new ecosystem, which often happens very quickly after introduction. Invasive species can be plants, animals, and other organisms (such as microbes or fungi). Most alien introductions result from human activities. A well-known terrestrial example of an alien or exotic species is the red imported fire ant, a native of South America first introduced to the United States in 1930s. They entered the U.S. through Mobile, Alabama, probably in soil used for ships' ballast. The fire ant has infested more than 260 million acres of land in nine southeastern states, replacing large parts of the native ant community as it continues to spread. Another example of an invasive species is the Asian tiger mosquito, introduced to the U.S. from Japan in the mid-1980s and now spreading to many regions. This mosquito attacks more hosts than any mosquito in the world. It can transfer disease organisms from one species to another, including into humans.

Invasive species affect all regions of the United States and every nation in the world. People, too, pay a high price, measured in billions of dollars for damaged goods and equipment, a degraded environment, disease, and even death. Alien species invasions can result in the loss of native species and biological diversity at a rate that ranks second only to habitat destruction. Some of the most serious and costly alien invaders include human, animal, and plant diseases (such as West Nile virus), agricultural pests (such as the Africanized honeybee, Russian thistle, and the imported red fire ant), and a host of seemingly harmless species whose sheer numbers overwhelm native ecosystems (such as zebra mussels, purple loosestrife, European green crabs, and hydrilla).

In the United States alone, approximately 50,000 alien species are known, and the number continues to grow. By some estimates, the major environmental damages, losses, and control measures for invasive species cost the nation an average of $138 billion per year. Invasive species also threaten nearly half of the species currently protected under the Endangered Species Act.

The introduction and spread of invasive species are caused by many factors, including, but not limited to:

• expanded global trade,
• the harvesting of exotic marine species to satisfy the popular aquarium trade,
• the use of non-native species in agriculture to control unwanted pests.

Invasive species also are introduced into coastal waters when large ships exchange their ballast water. It is important to study invasive species to learn about the effects they may have on native organisms and the physical environment.

Controlling invasive species is difficult because scientists know little about when new aquatic alien invaders arrive in our waters. The introduction and viability of lionfish along the U.S. East Coast are leading to new perspectives on how fish invasions may pose threats to marine ecosystems. Many scientists, like Paula Whitfield and Jonathan Hare (2003), believe that scientists must expand their research on invasive species and develop plans to manage, mitigate and minimize their effects on ecosystems that are already stressed due to other human activities (often called stressors).

Lionfish are highly visible, recognizable, and distinctive. Many other less recognizable invasive invertebrates and freshwater fish are causing real problems, too. Recent research on lionfish raised potentially troubling questions with no clear answers.

http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/stories/lionfish/lion01_whatis.html

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Re: African Lionfish from the Red Sea

Postby fishnfool73 » Sat May 02, 2009 10:34 pm

This was posted here a few months ago. There was a decent debate on it worth looking it up.
Dreaming the dream that one day I can be as good as some of the boatless pros and catch some 12 inch mangrove snapper.
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Re: African Lionfish from the Red Sea

Postby StyngRay » Sat May 02, 2009 11:22 pm

Thx for the reply FF73.
this is a topic that requires a re-vamping.
I'm not talking about furs or leather, I speak of oceanic activity. (That's why we're here.)
I can't say I remembered who started the first topic, I can only help remind the masses.

These Lionfish and Snakeheads will end a great deal of fishery before our time is up.

We need to do something about it.
The Bahamiain Islands are recruting divers to take them out by spears.
There's evan a tournament for the largest Lion or Snake.
They are causing havic along our outer-reef system including our neighoring islands.

I think this is more important than seals... sorry James.
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Re: African Lionfish from the Red Sea

Postby fishnfool73 » Sun May 03, 2009 12:46 am

I agree RAY it is a problem that will only get worse with time as tey establish themselves and begin breeding. I had a lionfish in a tank it ate everything half it size and killed anything else.
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Re: African Lionfish from the Red Sea

Postby StyngRay » Sun May 03, 2009 3:20 am

I also had a Lionfish when I owned a saltwater tank.
Years ago it died, I guess It was for the better.
I will never buy another one nor decide to release it.
This is a lesson learned. :ying:
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Re: African Lionfish from the Red Sea

Postby bolo » Sun May 03, 2009 7:48 am

Let the googan harvest them and problem solve.
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Re: African Lionfish from the Red Sea

Postby fishnfool73 » Sun May 03, 2009 7:59 am

bolo wrote:Let the googan harvest them and problem solve.


I give you permission to harvest them, BOLO.
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Re: African Lionfish from the Red Sea

Postby bolo » Sun May 03, 2009 8:07 am

fishnfool73 wrote:
bolo wrote:Let the googan harvest them and problem solve.


I give you permission to harvest them, BOLO.


I don't think they are a match against my Accurate. I probably have to use a K-Mart special to feel the hit. 8) Ricky, I need a recipe for Lionfish.
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Re: African Lionfish from the Red Sea

Postby StyngRay » Sun May 03, 2009 10:22 am

bolo wrote: I need a recipe for Lionfish.


Here's a recipe:
Spear and grill. Get them out of the water at all cost.
Bonfire + lionfish = meal
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